Category Archives: Fascism

Lenin’s Ghost and More Marxist Breadcrumbs 9/30/07

Pravda, Ghost of Lenin sighted in the Kremlin

“Two years ago I worked at the President’s Archives located in the Kremlin,” says Sergei Kuleshov, a historian and colleague of Gorbovski’s. “I was having my lunch one day in a canteen. A friend of mine introduced me to a gray-haired gentleman who sat at our table.

He was a KGB colonel in charge of security of a building hosting Lenin’s former apartment and study. We were making jokes with regard to the supernatural as we ate our lunches. Suddenly, the KGB man stopped smiling and told us a story about footsteps and other strange sounds coming from Lenin’s apartment at night. He said that that his colleagues and he had repeatedly heard the footsteps and sounds that resembled those produced by furniture being shuffled around the floor. The sounds were coming from Lenin’s study, which was locked and sealed, not to mention a number of guards who watched it round the clock.

Senator Jim DeMint, Against Dem Plan to Socialize Medicine

Gerald Warner, Liberal consensus on Burma is humbug and hypocrisy

In Burma, socialism did what it does best: transformed a nation of fertile land and rich resources into an economic basket case (if you are reading this anywhere in central Scotland, a glance out of the window will illustrate the point). It was rice shortages (in Burma!) that provoked the uprising in 1988 that was so bloodily put down by a regime that thenceforth became a straightforward military dictatorship.

Now we are told it would be immoral to have dealings with the regime. In terms of moral absolutism, that seems indisputable; but where is the ethical consistency? The Burmese rulers killed, at the highest estimate, 10,000 people in 1988. Multiply that several times, if you like, to cover all victims of repression in the intervening and antecedent years. It is difficult to take the estimate as high as 100,000. Yet Red China has murdered 65 million people.

What is our posture towards Beijing? In economic terms, we simply cannot do enough for the comrades. Between 1998, when Britain established a “co-operative partnership” with China, and 2003, our trade with Beijing doubled from $5bn to $10bn. The UK’s actual investment in China also leapt by over $10bn in the same period. In 2005, UK companies spent more than $4.5bn on 15 Chinese companies. Perhaps one is missing something, but what was the qualitative difference between the lives lost in Tiananmen Square in 1989 and those killed in Burma in 1988?

Times Online, Stalin, the ogre who won’t go away

Stalin died in 1953, his body now lying outside the walls of the Kremlin, but his ghost is still with us. That is one of the things I learnt over the past five years as I travelled back and forth between England and Russia to interview the last survivors of his Great Terror – a generation that is about to disappear. This was a unique opportunity because the average age of the people who told us their stories was 80 and many have since died. People handed over letters that had been hidden under mattresses, diaries – some written in code – and boxes of photographs.

Tonya, in her sixties, showed me an old towel that her mother had embroidered while in a labour camp. She had never spoken before about being the child of a gulag prisoner for fear of persecution. I soon realised that the first thing that happens when a family has suffered repression is that the children suffer “inherited” or habitual fear. It passes down the generations, reducing voices to a whisper and silencing tongues.

Michael Evans, How Soviet ‘Laurel and Hardy’ punished Rudolf Hess

The daily regime faced by Rudolf Hess, Hitler’s deputy, during his two decades as the sole prisoner in Spandau Jail in Berlin was made as harsh as possible by two Soviet officials described as a “sinister Laurel and Hardy team”, newly declassified files have revealed. […]

In one Foreign Office file, Bob de Burlet, the British governor at Spandau, wrote in May 1974: “The Soviet governor, Voitov, short, fat and roly-poly, and his chief henchman, Fedorov, thin and sallow, are a couple of sneaky and mean individuals who are perfectly cast in their villainous roles as a sort of sinister Laurel and Hardy team.”

Against the wishes of the three other governors, they insisted on removing Hess’s spectacles at 10pm every night so that he could not read, refused to let him have winter socks, obstructed attempts to have his run-down cell refurbished, and demanded that every notebook he had filled with his thoughts be destroyed.

The Sun, Give us the promised referendum

As for the issue of Europe, the Prime Minister was almost contemptuous.

He dismissed the new Constitution, renamed the Reform Treaty, in just two curt sentences.

“I accept my responsibility to write in detail into the amended treaty the red lines we have negotiated for Britain.”

That may be his responsibility.

If he believes this treaty is good for Britain, he should be prepared to take it to the British people so we can make up our own minds.

It is his sworn duty to give a final say to the people of Britain. He is forgetting his promise.

We intend to keep reminding him — right up to election day.

Britain under the EU will soon learn what taxation without representation is all about. What kind of tea party will they throw?

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More Marxist Breadcrumbs 9/28/07

In the real world Communism has been discredited as a system. When the USSR failed, it proved that ideological socialism coupled to the apparatus of state terror is no way to run a country, though it is an effective way to create Hell on Earth. And yet Marxist and Communist memes persist because there are still useful idiots lurking like parasites who continue to spread Marxist propaganda to people who never thought about it.

And there are those who for some reason need to educate their fellow man about the inhuman evil that is Communism and Socialism.

A Trail of Marxist Breadcrumbs

Lenin, Lenin’s Tomb

One of the central Marxist sites on the web. I once summarized it as “Communist agitprop, anti-Jew, pro-Islam, this is what Evil looks like.” I still think so.

Melissa Grosse, Letters to the Editor: Communism is not the right answer

Griffiths aptly stated that, ” … we have the freedom to make mistakes, and the freedom to make other people pay for them.” I heartily disagree – we do have the freedom to make mistakes, but we do not have the freedom to make others pay for them.

This is a “privilege” granted by the socialist government programs in practice (Social Security, welfare, Medicare/Medicaid) that have been, over time, proven inherently flawed.

I would like to know if Griffiths is the only child in her family, or if maybe she would have been one of those aborted had the same restrictions that exist in China existed here.

Grosse is correct. When someone makes a mistake and then makes others pay for their mistake, that is called theft or fraud… or socialism.

The watermelons (green on the outside, red on the inside) take a turn too. Check out this string of assertions.

Jane Cutter, Capitalism creates incentives to destroy rainforests

Capitalism is the biggest threat to the environment.

The anarchy of the profit-based system leads to convoluted “solutions” like carbon offsetting to address the growing crisis of global warming. These are not solutions at all. [WP: This is true. Carbon offsets are a scam.]

Socialism is the real answer to the dire problems faced by the planet and its inhabitants. Socialism is a system based on centralized economic planning without the profit motive.

While socialist planning by itself cannot resolve the environmental crisis, it lays the basis for us to organize life to meet human needs while protecting the planet that sustains us.

Mark J. Perry, Socialism Works, But Only if You Know Their Names

After Walter Willams’ dinner speech last night, Robert Barro asked a question about whether the government had any obligation to provide any socialist-type safety-net programs for the general good.

Walter responded something like this. “Let me make this perfectly clear. I support and practice many types of socialist programs including income redistribution, welfare payments, disability support, free health care, and social saftey nets. But I only practice socialism IN MY OWN FAMILY; and socialism like this only works when you know the names of the people involved. In any situation when you personally can’t name everybody involved, then the market is superior to socialism.”

Brown Hound, How to Shatter A Castro-phile’s Arguments

Q. Didn’t the U.S. Defense Department come out with a report saying that Cuba is not a threat to the United States?

A. Yes, although the report’s drafter turned out to be Ana Belen Montes, a woman who was convicted for espionage on behalf of the Cuban regime. Although Cuba may not pose a conventional military threat to the U.S., it clearly demonstrated, with Ana Belen Montes, that it is an intelligence threat. The Cuban regime considers itself an enemy of the USG and is an instigator of anti-American activities all over the world, especially in Latin America. Its functionaries in Venezuela and Bolivia right now are helping leaders there assault those countries’ democratic institutions. Cuba is on the list of countries that support international terrorism; any intelligence it picks up from the USA, it can be expected to pass on to other rogue states or groups that are enemies of the USA.

Michael Martinez, Castro appears healthy in new video

HAVANA—Largely alert and lucid, Fidel Castro made a surprise appearance on a TV news program Friday night in a pre-recorded, hour-long interview, speaking about an essay he wrote last week condemning the U.S. for threatening the global economy.

His appearance was unusual because Castro has largely been out of the public eye since he underwent emergency intestinal surgery 14 months ago.

The government has at times shown photographs and video of Castro, but his exact illness and prognosis have been kept secret. His last state TV interview was in June.

Vanessa Veiock, Illuminating communism’s shadows

Saturated with innumerable, carefully sketched dark lines and splashes of glaring red, Peter Sís’ new book could be two different things: a children’s story about communism or an adult book with illustrations.

“I’m leaving it as a message to find its audience,” the author and illustrator said about his latest creation, The Wall: Growing Up Behind the Iron Curtain.

Originally created to help his children better understand his past, the autobiographical, visual narrative is shelved under children’s literature, but it prevails as an engaging adult book centered on Sís’ childhood in Cold War-era Prague.

Vheadline, Diana Raby: ‘Democracy and Revolution,’ Venezuela and 21st Century Socialism

In ‘Democracy and Revolution,’ Raby argues that Cuba, and above all Venezuela, provide inspiration for anti-globalization and anti-capitalist movements across the world. Another world is possible, but only through an effective political strategy to win power on a popular and democratic basis.

Raby argues passionately that the way forward for progressives is not to be found in the dogmatic formulae of the Old Left, nor in the spontaneous autonomism of John Holloway or Tony Negri. Instead, it is to be found in new, broad and flexible popular movements with bold and determined leadership.

Examining the relationship of key leaders to their people, including Hugo Chavez and the Sandinistas in Nicaragua, Raby shows that it is more necessary than ever to take power, peacefully where possible, but in all cases with the strength that comes from popular unity backed by force where necessary. In this way it is possible to build democratic power, which may or may not be socialist depending on one’s definition, but which represent the real anti-capitalist alternative for the twenty-first century.

Diana Raby is Senior Research Fellow at the Research Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Liverpool (UK) and also holds the rank of Professor Emeritus in the Department of History, University of Toronto, where she taught for many years.

She is the author of numerous academic publications on populism, popular movements and revolution, with reference particularly to Mexico, Cuba, Venezuela and Portugal.

Diana has also long been active in solidarity movements and progressive political causes in both Canada and the UK.

Just to underline the point, “Raby shows that it is more necessary than ever to take power, peacefully where possible, but in all cases with the strength that comes from popular unity backed by force where necessary.” She is a thug at heart, as are all communist revolutionaries.

Inigo Guevara, Socialism: alive and well in the new Venezuela

Venezuela has drawn attention because of the rhetoric from President Hugo Chavez, who appears keen to turn Venezuela, the region’s oldest democracy, into a militarised state.

Venezuela’s armed forces were, for most of the second part of the 20th century, a good example of a professional, modern and competent fighting force, at least by Latin American standards. The National Armed Forces comprise four traditional elements: an army, navy, air force and national guard. They have been traditionally non-political, but recent changes within the armed forces – and a deeper relationship with the Cuban military – have prompted a rethink about their roles and missions. While some institutional change has been under way since 1999, the past few months have seen an acceleration of this process, from symbolism and rhetoric that equates the regime’s importance to the survival of the modern state to organic, administrative and constitutional changes.

In March, the Venezuelan Army began the promotion of what it calls “the new military thought” among its ranks, redefining the armed forces’ active role in the consolidation of 21st century socialism in Venezuela. This was re-affirmed during May, with the official elevation of a new motto: ‘Country, Socialism or Death!’. Each soldier must pronounce these words before referring to a superior. Accordingly, the non-political nature of the armed forces has been challenged as the motto suggests that the armed forces should support whoever is in power and, in this case, socialism is the government’s policy.

Our next contributor is a student trying to get advice. The sad thing about the page is how much bad advice he gets from his fellow students before someone points out that Capitalism is an economic system and Socialism is a political system, but forgets to mention that they work together in China, which is just a lovely place to live if you aren’t Falun Gong.

Matherly, Socialism vs Capitalism- where to begin?

I am going to be involved in an informal debate in the Real World, not at BABB concerning the merits of Socialism and Capitalism. Now, I know the basics from my Micro- and MacroEconomic courses in college but I want to do some research that really looks into the two systems and criticises them both positivly and negativly (I want to avoid Straw Men versions)

My question: do any of you have any sources you would recommend? I am quite happy to go to the library so the recommended sources do not have to be on the Internet.

DeanVX, Communism: Worse Than Nazism

Isn’t it interesting that when we see something going on in the world that we don’t like, we compare it to Nazism? People on the far left & far right have done it. Liberals call anyone with even one conservative viewpoint a “Nazi.” Staunch conservatives who oppose abortion have compared it to the Nazis rounding up Jews & sending them to concentration camps. People somehow feel morally superior if they can get away with calling someone they don’t like a Nazi. If you’re one of these people, then I’m going to have to burst your bubble. While the Nazis were bad, they weren’t the ultimate form of evil in the 20th – and even the 21st – century. The ultimate evildoers were communists. Consider:

During Joseph Stalin’s reign, it is estimated that 20 million Russians were rounded up and murdered. Soviet gulags were not completely unlike Nazi concentration camps. The concentration camps existed for about 12 years. Gulags were around for much, much longer. Stalin tends to get a free pass, probably because the Soviets were our allies during World War II.

Opium addiction had been a major problem in China for about two centuries when the communists seized power there in the late 1940s. The communists wiped it out overnight. How did they do it? The communists rounded up all the opium addicts – sometimes entire families – and executed them. Quite an effective drug treatment program, huh? The true number of those who were murdered is unknown, but it has been estimated that between one-quarter & one-third of China’s population was addicted to opium when the communists took over the country.

He sums up the history lecture (drawing on the Black Book of Communism and other sources based on the Soviet Archives) comparing Communism with the National Socialist German Workers’ Party, ending with a sensible suggestion:

So remember, when you see something evil going on in the world, the first words out of your mouth shouldn’t be, “That’s just like what the Nazis would do.” The first words should be, “That’s just like what the Communists did.”

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Reasons to be Cynical

One was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1939 for being the leader of the National Socialist German Worker’s Party. One was nominated in 1945 and 1948 for being the most prolific mass murderer of the 20th Century. One won the prize after being the worst American President of the 20th Century. One won the prize for negligence while watching over North Korean and Iranian nuclear weapons development. One won the prize for presiding over the UN during the Oil for Food scandal, in which his own son was a major player. One won the prize for appeasing the totalitarian regime in North Korea. One won the prize for masterminding terrorist attacks against Israel for fifty years. One won the prize for creating a nation of militant refugees and helping them double in size. One won the prize for leading the North Vietnamese Communist Party and rejected it as he hadn’t yet unleashed half a million boat people to dare the high seas in small boats in order to escape his workers’ paradise.

There are plenty more examples of Progressive thought where that came from.

And another reason… Have you heard the one about Columbia University inviting the Jew-hating dictator of a terror-sponsoring state to campus for a talk in 2007, and 1933?

H/T: LGF 1, 2

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Who says “I’m glad to sit here at the right hand of Satan”?

The year was 1999. Hillary Clinton was the true-believing first lady to her disgraced, pandering husband, Bill Clinton. The occasion was the presentation of the Norman Cousins’ award to Walter Cronkite by the World Federalist Association, an organization in favor of replacing national governments with a single, all powerful, progressive one-world government. The man was Walter Cronkite. The speech can be read here (edited to be less embarrassing to Cronkite and Clinton), or watched here.

Around 14:00 in the video, Cronkite said:

Even as with the American rejection of the League of Nations, our failure to live up to our obligations to the United Nations is led by a handful of willful senators who choose to pursue their narrow, selfish political objectives at the cost of our nation’s conscience.They pander to and are supported by the Christian Coalition and the rest of the religious right wing. Their leader, Pat Robertson, has written that we should have a world government but only when the messiah arrives. Any attempt to achieve world order before that time must be the work of the Devil!

The following section of the speech as recorded in the written text is not to be found in the video.

This small but well-organized group, has intimidated both the Republican Party and the Clinton administration. It has attacked each of our Presidents since FDR for supporting the United Nations. Robertson explains that these Presidents were and are the unwitting agents of Lucifer.

What he actually says is:

Well join me… I’m glad to sit here at the right hand of Satan.

¡hay caramba!

At 15:30 the viewer will see Hillary Clinton praising Walter Cronkite for his tireless service for leftist and one-world-government causes, and cheering on the one world government plans of the World Federalist Association.

Jerome R. Corsi writes:

The World Federalist Association, now known as Citizens for Global Solutions, says its aim is to be build a “future in which nations work together to abolish war, protect our rights and freedoms and solve the problems facing humanity that no nation can solve alone.”

The YouTube.com video also recalls a 1993 award the World Federalist Association gave to journalist Strobe Talbot for an editorial he wrote in Time magazine July 20, 1992.

Talbott argued that in the next hundred years, “nationhood as we know it will be obsolete; all states will recognize a single, global authority.”

The video noted that in 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed Talbott ambassador at large.

Clinton had met Talbott at Oxford University, where they were both Rhodes Scholars.

H/T: Tiger at Observanda

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WordPress Blocked in Turkey

Seems that paranoid Creationist Adnan Oktar, aka Harun Yahya, has pressed the Turkish courts to issue an Internet ban on the whole WordPress.Com domain in Turkey, because he claims to have been libeled on some Turkish language blogs on WordPress.

This is one of the perils of increasing Globalization, along with libel tourism.

Give moral support to WordPress to stand firm against this sort of fascist pressure to censor vast groups of people to protect the feelings of a single, well-funded crackpot.

Update: An explanation from “Edip” who is the target of the block.

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HuffPo Fascist Calls for Coup D’etat in USA

As Captain’s Quarters pointed out tonight, there is a snakepit of fascism and treason in the US that seeks to overthrow the president in a Coup D’etat: The ringleader is Martin Lewis at the Huffington Post.

Martin Lewis claims that the military can arrest a President while not conducting a coup d’etat by focusing only on his role as Commander in Chief of the military:
General Pace – you have the power to fulfill your responsibility to protect the troops under your command. Indeed you have an obligation to do so.

You can relieve the President of his command.

I’m not linking to this at the HuffPo. Follow the links through CQ if you must.

H/T: memeorandum.

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Why the Fairness Doctrine is totally totally totally unnecessary

Ian Gallagher responded in the comments:

It’s confusing to me when I hear people call for government to stay out of the broadcasting business. Broadcasting as we know it would not exist were it not for government involvement in assigning exclusive use of portions of the public airwaves and enforcing those rights against any encroachers. By contrast, newspapers don’t rely on the exclusive use of public property to provide service. If the government owned all of the printing presses in the country and gave them out on an exclusive basis to certain selected citizens, the analogy to broadcasting would be more accurate.This government-created system permits the government to impose fiduciary duties on broadcasters that it could not impose on newspapers under the First Amendment.

. A license permits broadcasting, but the licensee has no constitutional right to be the one who holds the license or to monopolize a radio frequency to the exclusion of his fellow citizens. There is nothing in the First Amendment which prevents the Government from requiring a licensee to share his frequency with others of his community and present those views which would otherwise, by necessity, be barred from the airwaves

No one has a First Amendment right to monopolize a broadcast frequency. Unlike newspaper owners, every broadcaster knows going in that his ability to pursue his private interests are constrained by the obligation to serve the public

And we should not be deterred in this critical task by those who would use specious constitutional arguments

Dear Ian,

If you look into the industry literature, you will discover that wireless, coaxial cable, and optical fiber offer limitless bandwidth for digital signals. The ability of equipment to encode and compress information in ever smaller slices is the limiting factor. How will the inviolable wireless frequencies be determined? Shall we use the frequency bands that were necessary for 1930’s radio and television technology or those that are necessary now, or those that will become possible in the future? I don’t know whether you are from the US or England or Titan, where I live. When I talk specifics, I will talk about one of these places, and not about the others.

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