It’s Bad in Chad

Walid Phares lays it out on the Counterterrorism Blog.

In less than 12 hours the so-called armed opposition of Chad, crossed the entire country from its Eastern frontiers with Islamist-ruled Sudan to the capital N’Djamena across from Northern Nigeria. The latest reports mention fierce battles around the Presidential Palace and back and forth inside the city. But at this stage the geo-political consequences are crucial for the next stages locally, regionally and internationally. The bottom line is that in one day, what could become the future Taliban of Chad have scored a strategic victory not only against the Government of the country (which was supposed to back up the UN plans to save Darfur in Sudan) but also against the efforts by the African Union and European Union to contain the Sudanese regime and stop the Genocide. Today’s offensive, regardless of the next developments, has already changed the geopolitics of Africa. Outmaneuvering the West and Africans, those regimes and forces standing behind the “opposition” have shown that they are restless in their campaign against human rights and self determination on the continent. But even more importantly the events of today shows how unprepared are Europeans and Americans in front of Jihadi regimes which seem weak on the surface but highly able to surprise and crumble Western efforts of containment.

Read the rest.

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One response to “It’s Bad in Chad

  1. From a comment I posted at the Belmont Club.

    Walid Phares added to this story at the Counterterrorism Blog.

    Amazingly, as the “opposition” forces have reached N’Djamena the official minister of what could become the future Taliban regime in Chad, Jibrin Issa was comfortably seated in al Jazeera’s studios in Qatar. Obviously he wasn’t flown from Africa to the Gulf on the request of the booking Department of the Qatari funded network to “react” to the offensive. He was already at the station -or at least in Qatar-when the offensive began. Very interestingly, the man was wearing a classical Western business outfit and clean shaved. The PR strategy was to show the world, including France and the US, that the forces thrusting into their ally wasn’t a sister of the Islamic Courts of Somalia or a Taliban “looking” militia. The game was to project this coup as “domestic” against “corruption” and the rest of the litany, thus boring for average Western public.

    Issa played the script very well until a point where reality surfaced abruptly. At first, as I was listening to his impeccable Arabic, I was wondering why did he have this Arabian Peninsula accent and utter those mechanical sentences. It was strange to hear an African “minister” of a future regime in Chad speaking excellent Arabic, but I gave it a pass. Until, at the end of his interview he made a troubling mistake. Out of the blue he started to thank the “brave commander of the Islamic Republic of Sudan” General Omar al Bashir (the head of the regime responsible for the Genocide in Darfur) for his help to the “movement” and started to praise his “highness the servant of the two shrines,” (that is the Saudi Monarch) for his support (obviously to the movement). Suddenly, and despite the frustration of the al jazeera anchor that the game may have been exposed, I connected the dots. It was indeed a Sudanese-backed operation to change the regime in Chad, and backed by Wahabi circles, as a preemptive move to crumble the forthcoming humanitarian operation in Darfur.

    The so-called rebellion in Chad is not a rebellion, but rather an invasion by Saudi-funded and Sudan-trained forces with the intention of overthrowing the government of Chad and replacing it with a “native” African Taliban.

    This may be one place the US has to take a hand in, much as the US has with Ethiopian help in Somalia.